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CBCT News and Events

September 29, 2022

The Holy Cross Hospital in Maryland

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 The Holy Cross Hospital in Maryland has witnessed immense suffering over the two years of the pandemic. Between March 2020 and February 2022, Holy Cross Health (Holy Cross Hospital, Holy Cross Germantown Hospital, and Holy Cross Health Network) cared for over 8,000 patients with a COVID–19 diagnosis and attended over 800 COVID–19 deaths. This speaks to the level of strength, resilience, and compassion of its staff and providers. 

Holy Cross Health was excellent at offering compassionate care to others, but what about the needs of their staff and the medical professionals serving those patients? To celebrate their dedication, Father Kirtley Yearwood commissioned two Broadway dancers to create a video to be shown throughout the Holy Cross Health system as a means of encouraging self-compassion and promoting well-being among the staff, providers, and contracted healthcare professionals. 

The team responsible for this video includes Kamille Upshaw, who was the Dance Captain for Broadway’s, “MJ The Musical” and a swing dancer in “Hamilton,” among other major productions. Chanel DaSilva is a choreographer for The Joffrey Ballet and a co-founder of MoveNYC. These two Julliard–trained professionals created and filmed “A Time of Stillness: A Dance of Compassion” on location at the Holy Cross hospitals. It is an interpretive dance that draws from the insights of CBCT® (Cognitively-Based Compassion Training) as a grace–filled offering of love that expresses and acknowledges key moments in caring for COVID–19 patients. 

Further, it is meant to support staff and providers to be open to practicing kindness and gentleness toward self. “A Time of Stillness: A Dance of Compassion” premiered at Holy Cross Health on Friday, March 4, 2022 on the second anniversary of Holy Cross diagnosing the first COVID–19 patient in the State of Maryland. The ceremony was officiated by His Eminence Wilton Cardinal Gregory, Archbishop of Washington. Watch the video of “A Time of Stillness: A Dance of Compassion” by clicking here.

 

August 30, 2022

Dr. Fernandez-Carriba is the creator of this first International Meeting for the CBCT® Community en español

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Dr. Fernandez-Carriba is the creator of this first International Meeting for the CBCT® Community en español, co-sponsored by the Center for Contemplative Science and Contemplative-Based Ethics (CCSCBE). The developer of CBCT®, Lobsang Tenzin Negi, PhD, and Executive Director of the CCSCBE will be the event keynote speaker. With more than 20 years of experience serving professionals and families of individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder and other disabilities, Dr. Fernandez-Carriba works internationally, primarily in the US, Spain, and Latin America. He obtained his PhD from Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain and completed his postdoctoral fellowship at Emory University. As a senior level CBCT® Instructor, he investigates and applies clinically the CBCT® core teachings of compassion training to families and providers consisting of strategies to foster resilience and social competence to populations under high stress. Dr. Fernandez-Carriba’s recent work has led to three peer-reviewed articles, including a study using a brief Mindfulness intervention during the COVID-19 lockdown and “Mindfulness y meditación contra el estrés causado por el autism” covered by CNN Español (in Spanish, https://cnn.it/2hIhKiG).

For more information about the International Meeting for the CBCT® Community en español or to register, click here.

 

July 27, 2022

Explore compassion and cultivate connection to bolster well-being

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Join us for the CBCT® Foundation Course this fall. This course will be taught by the developer of CBCT, Professor Lobsang Tenzin Negi. The course will be offered over two weekends, Saturdays and Sundays, September 17 and 18 and October 8 and 9. You will have the option to attend in-person or online via Zoom. CBCT® is a research-based approach to fostering personal resilience and sustaining warm-hearted relationships.

For details, click here. Public CBCT® Courses and Continuing Education | CBCT® Compassion Training - Emory University

 

June 28, 2022

Can CBCT® Unlock Your Superpower? 

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“Blaming someone else has always been one of my defense mechanisms and a way of avoiding taking responsibility for my life. I didn’t mess myself up, right? Why should I have to take responsibility for fixing myself?!  

Honestly, that is the way I thought for the greater part of fifty years – until I was introduced to Cognitive Based Compassion Training (CBCT) through Emory Healthcare in my first unit of Clinical Pastoral Education.  

In our class we first experienced compassion towards self by learning to recognize nurturing moments that take place throughout our day and feel the resulting kindness in ourselves. As we consciously drank that in more and more of this kindness and compassion, we were more easily able to pour it out to those we care for. 

This awareness opened a world that I didn’t trust existed, instead of being defensive I started to feel relaxed and happy. It also became easier for me to catch a negative thought or feeling and calm it or release it before acting on it. 

CBCT reminded me of the gap that exists between thought and action and that space is where our freedom lies. I had a tough day at the hospital and even though I gave up drinking, I was planning a drink on the way home, where I was going to stop, what it was going to taste like, and how relaxed and good I was going to feel afterwards. Then I remembered that this was just a feeling and I wondered what was behind it? I realized that I was frustrated because I felt like I had not accomplished anything that day. As soon as I put the realization and the feeling together, my “need” to drink disappeared.  

Another day I was at the dentist and feeling a bit stressed which was reflected when the hygienist took my blood pressure, and it was sky high. A week later, I returned to the dentist, and I remembered to take myself to a nurturing moment in my mind, which I did, and my blood pressure was 35 points lower than it was the prior week! 

The following day I was outside feeding the birds and admiring and feeling grateful for the beautiful day, really being present, and Spirit told me that I had found my Superpower through CBCT. It was a YES! Moment. I couldn’t wait to tell my husband. I have this superpower within myself, and it doesn’t matter what happens outside because I am the one deciding my response. It gives me a wonderful sense of agency, of overseeing my feelings and not being pushed around my circumstances. Most importantly, it aligns me with Spirit.  

Another aspect of the training is expanding our compassion to all beings by picturing them as able to become happy. The first time that I did the exercise, I pictured a man that used to work for me that I never did like very well. I was able to picture him happy but hadn’t thought about him again. Yesterday, Spirit set me up. I saw the man at the grocery store across from my office and actually hoped that he would stop in and see me. I would never have felt that tenderness towards him before doing the exercise!  

I never needed “fixing,” I just needed to experience love and compassion, and find it within myself. I am in control of my well-being and as a result, I am able to give from a glad heart. That’s my superpower and the realization of this gift makes me cry.” 

~ Katrina Andrews, who took an introduction to CBCT® as a chaplain intern at Emory. 

 

The Compassion Center is grateful to Ms. Andrews for taking the time to send this message and then giving permission to share it with others. 

 

May 23, 2022

Atlanta’s Resiliency Resource for Frontline Workers’ Program At-a-Glance

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CBCT® is being offered to dozens of frontline healthcare workers as part a new Emory program funded by the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. The program, called Atlanta’s Resiliency Resource fOr Frontline Workers (ARROW), is designed to build resiliency and strengthen resolve among clinicians, police, and public safety officers. In partnership with Emory University School of Nursing, Grady Health System, and Emory University and Health System Police and Public Safety Departments, ARROW will offer comprehensive resources for resiliency enrichment, training, and professional development for both practicing and student nurses, physicians, and public safety personnel.

The aim is to increase the number of frontline workers trained and certified in CBCT® (Cognitively-Based Compassion Training) and in CRM® (Community Resiliency Model) to reduce, address, and prevent burnout, mental health conditions, substance use disorders, and suicide. ARROW targets workers across the 29-county Atlanta metropolitan statistical area.

 

April 23, 2022

Have you taken the CBCT® Foundation Course?

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Are you interested in joining a community of practitioners skillfully sharing CBCT with others? The CBCT Teacher Certification Program application deadline has been extended to May 15. We are accepting a new cohort of experienced and eager practitioners. This high-quality training is designed for those wishing to share CBCT in their community or in research settings.

A series of retreats, workshops, and coaching sessions held over several months will provide a thorough understanding of the CBCT rationale and its core content, as well as the skills to expertly lead adult learning groups and guide meditations. This June, in collaboration with Tibethaus in Germany, we will have our first German-speaking group to begin the teacher training. Other past participants have come from diverse backgrounds and locations including the U.S., Brazil, Chile, France, Israel, Mexico, Peru, and Spain. Learn about the program and application here .

 

 

January 26, 2022

New Research on CBCT ® for HIV+ Patients

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We spoke recently with Boghuma K. Titanji, MD, PhD and her research partners about their new study, “Cognitively-Based Compassion Training for HIV Immune Non-responders – An Attention-Placebo Randomized Controlled Trial,” published in JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes: December 7, 2021.  Here is what they reported:

“Non-pharmacologic interventions can play an important role in reducing inflammation related to HIV-infection and should be studied.  Inflammation is responsible for all of the serious diseases that reduce quality of life and longevity.  In our study we demonstrated both the feasibility and potential benefit of cognitively based compassion training for people with HIV infection who have had difficulty in recovering their immune system after treatment. 

“We found a significant association between CBCT ® practice time engagement and a reduction in important markers of inflammation.  These changes were coincident with significant increases in self-reported psychological well-being and HIV disease acceptance and benefits for CBCT ® participants. 

“CBCT ® is a novel and feasible non-medication-based intervention that could reduce inflammation and psychological stress in people with HIV.  We hope to explore this approach in larger studies to benefit this patient population.”

Tim Harrison

Timothy Harrison, Associate Director for CBCT ®, was one of the contemplative investigators on the research team, alongside Compassion Center founder Dr. Lobsang Tenzin Negi.  As one of the CBCT ® teachers for the study, Timothy reflects:

“Teaching CBCT ® to men living with HIV was deeply meaningful – particularly at Atlanta’s clinic downtown where so many are living on the edges of our society.  Though they were naturally hesitant to engage compassion meditation at first, and perhaps only showed up for the free snacks and bus tokens, the men soon opened up and engaged whole-heartedly the course activities, meditations, and discussions.  After a few class meetings, they began to report noticing habits of rumination and a new ability to tame the inner voices that excessively belittle or blame themselves.  Later on, some were even able to let go of some heavy, unhelpful resentments.

“CBCT’s approach seemed to speak to each of participants individually, to meet them where they were.  Many found ways to work with their inner demons, to focus and to sleep better, and to accept and love themselves more fully.  Several reported, in the end, that they were finding more belonging and gratitude in their relationships, not only with loved ones at home but also with the clinic workers whom they depend upon for life-saving treatments.”

 

November 29, 2021

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“What I appreciate most about CBCT ® is that it cultivates altruistic intentions through cognitive, affective, and motivational dimensions.  The program reminds us that we need to investigate how our belief shapes the way we feel and act.  Each individual module can be a lifetime practice; I have new insights about myself and others every time I attend a CBCT ® retreat.  I’m glad that I’ve adopted CBCT ® components for various teaching occasions, including the Women’s Employment and Essential Skills program this fall hosted by Opportunity Northeast in Spokane, Washington.”  

- Professor Gloria I-Ling Chien, Gonzaga University

 

Professor Chien’s first article, “Complementary Teaching Practices:  Ignatian Pedagogy and Buddhist-inspired Compassion Meditation,” in Teaching Theology & Religion 23, draws from her experience with teaching CBCT ® at a Jesuit University.  The research explores how CBCT ® aligns with the Ignatian Pedagogical Paradigm’s five elements: context, experience, reflection, action, and evaluation.  Modern Ignatian pedagogy is a distinctive feature of Jesuit education. 

Her second article is “Integrating Contemplative and Ignatian Pedagogies in a Buddhist Studies Classroom” in Religions 11. This study shows that the combination of contemplative pedagogy and the Ignatian Pedagogical Paradigm create a multidimensional environment in learning Buddhism in higher education.  Specific examples are given of multisensory contemplation activities – such as CBCT ® – that expand students’ ways of knowing about Buddhist practice and foster their consideration for others.

Dr. Chien’s students have shared with her how contemplative practice has helped them especially during the anxious time of the coronavirus pandemic.

 

October 29, 2021

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From the CBCT ® course, Trina was inspired by the quote, “compassion is the bridge to connection.”  She said, the idea of compassion as a lens and tool to focus our attention and relational being toward interdependence, common humanity, and seeing the vulnerability of others is powerful!  “I believe the affective nature of compassion (connectedness) leads to greater understanding, acceptance, and love (of self and others). I was also pleased with the practical approaches (exercises) for meditation and self-reflection, particularly the strategies to “shift” negative thinking styles.”

Over the last 15 months, Trina has worked with a team to develop and implement Emory’s Building Resilience and Compassion Enculturation (emBRACE) Peer Support Program.  The emBRACE program is an interprofessional, systems approach to decreasing the lasting burdens of secondary trauma and moral distress experienced by Emory employees.  Trained peer support leaders from Emory Healthcare and Emory University include physicians, nurses, advanced practice providers, social workers, and chaplains.

It turns out that many of the concepts of the CBCT ® for Nurses and Other Providers’ course align with the mission, goals, and objectives of emBRACE.  The CBCT ® course and practices offer an opportunity for self-assessment and ongoing self-reflection, as well as personal and professional growth.  According to Trina, “these complementary tools (CBCT ® and emBRACE) strengthen our abilities, outreach, and impact potential for individual wellness, social community, and structural (organizational) change toward well-being and joy in work.”

Joining Emory Healthcare in December 2011, she started as a Nurse Clinician at Emory University Hospital, Unit 10E.   She served in various Manager for Nursing positions at Emory Johns Creek Hospital from 2013 to April 2020, leading key strategic initiatives for nursing excellence, including EJCH’s initial Magnet® designation.

Trina has been in nursing leadership since April 2020, and is responsible for leading the development, implementation, and measurement of innovative, evidence-based, and evidence-informed nurse leadership preparation and support, including but not limited to, nursing leadership education, training, mentoring, and coaching.

CBCT ® Compassion Training for Nurses and Other Providers is a multi-part course combining a weekend workshop online via Zoom on August 7-8.  CNE and CEU credits are available.  For details, click here.  CBCT® Courses for Nurses | CBCT® Compassion Training - Emory University

 

September 29, 2021

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In the newly released Heroínas compasivas.  La vida como supervivientes de cáncer de mama [Compassionate Heroines:  Life as Breast Cancer Survivors], breast cancer survivors share their stories and how the practices of CBCT ® (Cognitively-Based Compassion Training) aided in re-learning to live after cancer.

Edited by Rebeca Diego Pedro, Edgar González Hernández, and Lobsang Tenzin Negi, the developer of CBCT and executive director of the Compassion Center, this Spanish-language book serves as a source of encouragement and hope, intended for cancer survivors and their caregivers, as well as clinicians, counselors, psychologists, and meditation practitioners

Dr. González-Hernández, an experienced CBCT instructor and professor of psychology at the Universidad de las Américas Puebla (UDLAP) in San Andrés Cholula, Mexico, was inspired to pursue this project based on his own experience teaching and researching CBCT with survivors of breast cancer in Spain.

The writing team included several long-time friends of the center, including CBCT teacher Sally Dodds and Thaddeus Pace who together pioneered research on CBCT with cancer survivors at the University of Arizona; senior CBCT instructor Samuel Fernandez-Carriba, a psychologist who leads the Spanish-language CBCT teacher certification program; and Timothy Harrison, associate director for CBCT at the Compassion Center.

 Heroínas compasivas.  La vida como supervivientes de cáncer de mama addresses the important question:  How do I embrace myself with kindness after my life has been changed by surviving cancer? 

Currently, only the Spanish edition is available. It may be purchased through online bookstores:  Casa del Libro, Desclée De Brouwer, Agapea, Emaús and Amazon.

 

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“The meaning of this book was a constant learning process…an honorable opportunity to deepen into the content and skills proposed by CBCT – together is always better.”  Edgar González-Hernández, PhD

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“The long-term implementation of compassion training can support a much-needed cultural shift signaling that compassion is an important value throughout our society.  If compassion is thoroughly integrated into education, healthcare, and other systems, it can positively impact the public domain in far-reaching and fundamental ways.”  Lobsang Tenzin Negi, PhD

 

July 29, 2021

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Jenna Olsen working in Petersburg Medical Center respiratory screening drive-thru tent – April 2020
Kayaking in Frederick Sound, Alaska with background view of Mitkof Island

Last August,  Jenna Olsen  completed the  CBCT ®  Compassion Training for Nurses and Other Providers’   course and was impressed with the training, exercises, and virtual meetings.  In addition, she appreciated the chance to interact with fellow nursing participants.  She reports, “The CBCT ®  training is applicable in our everyday lives, especially healthcare professionals.  Practicing CBCT ®  expands our empathy levels, recognizes suffering in others, builds greater compassion, develops more profound and meaningful connections with others, which brings up greater understanding and joy back into our lives.” 

At the time of the course, Jenna was managing the Joy Janssen Clinic at the critical access Petersburg Medical Center in Petersburg, Alaska.  Serving a population of approximately 3,000 residents, Petersburg is only accessible by air or water.  As the only hospital, the staff are called upon to serve many roles.  Jenna recalls that the pandemic triggered her stress response into overdrive.  She found herself spending countless hours researching and implementing procedures to protect the clinic staff and patients.    

“I was under such pressure that I was having difficulty calming my mind, and to the extent that I was having a hard time sleeping and coping.  As a result, I was searching for ways to relieve stress and came across a course offered through Emory University,  CBCT ®  Compassion Training for Nurses.   The course was usually only offered in person, but it was being offered online due to the pandemic, and I signed up without hesitation.”  

During the course, Jenna connected with others listening to their stories and struggles, while sharing her own experiences.  The module that most resonated with her was CBCT ® ’s  first module, Connecting to a Moment of Nurturance. “I shared this practice with our hospital staff at the end of a trauma debrief.  The CEO later thanked me for guiding the meditation, as he experienced a calmness and recognized that he wasn't aware of how stressed his body was feeling.”  

In November 2020, Jenna with the support of her husband decided it was time to begin a new direction.  She transitioned from her clinic management position and moved to Pennsylvania to be closer to family and to enroll in an RN-BSN program at Drexel University.  One of her summer courses is holistic self-care and she is acquiring new stress reduction techniques, as well as sharing with others the benefits of CBCT ® .  Jenna states, “I think we all would benefit from the CBCT ®  training.  I am very thankful that I was able to participate in the course and highly recommend it!”   

CBCT ®  Compassion Training for Nurses and Other Providers  is a multi-part course combining a weekend workshop online via Zoom on August 7-8.  CNE and CEU credits are available.  For details, click here.   CBCT® Courses for Nurses | CBCT® Compassion Training - Emory University  

 

July 20, 2021

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March 29, 2021

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CBCT ® certified teacher, nurse, and researcher, Flávia Kolchraiber, began working with IBEAC (Brazilian Institute of Community Studies and Support) fifteen years ago.  The Mobilizing Mothers - Excellence in Care Project began in 2017, by the Center for Excellence in Early Childhood through IBEAC.  Today, the Mobilizing Mothers are recognized as leaders in their communities.  They visit the homes of pregnant women and mothers with babies to educate about self-care before, during, and after birth.  There are discussions on healthy eating habits, violence prevention, and childhood care, including for babies with disabilities.  Many of the Mobilizing Mothers live in the communities they support.  The team seeks to create new perspectives and conditions for families and subsequently, to strengthen neighborhoods.  Through various programs, including Mobilizing Mothers, the Center for Excellence in Early Childhood is serving 1,500 families.

For more information about the Influencer Mothers - Excellence in Care Project, visit the Center for Excellence in Early Childhood Facebook page here . 

To see at-a-glance snapshot of the services provided in the Parelheiros region during 2020, by IBEAC and partners, click here.

Compassion Corps sm is Compassion Institute’s program to serve especially vulnerable populations by providing limited funding to certified compassion training teachers motivated to help communities where human suffering is immediate and obvious.

The CBCT ® Teacher Certification Program is currently accepting applications for a new cohort of experienced practitioners.  The program is primarily online and has been attended by individuals from across the US, Brazil, Chile, France, Germany, Israel, Mexico, Peru, and Spain.  Access the Overview PDF file here.

 

December 18, 2020

Each year, the Center accepts a new cohort of experienced practitioners to enroll in the six-month CBCT ® Teacher Certification program, which is designed to provide high quality teaching of CBCT ® for research purposes, as well as general sharing of the CBCT ® skills and content with a wider audience.  The program is designed to accommodate those outside Atlanta and has been attended by people from across the US, Brazil, Chile, France, Germany, Israel, Mexico, Peru, and Spain.  For full details about the program, access the Overview PDF file here:   2021 Teacher Certification Information.  Applications are now being accepted for the 2021 cohort.

 

December 1, 2020

How do we know compassion when we see it?  In October 2020, Frontiers in Psychology published a paper, “Ways of Knowing Compassion:  How Do We Come to Know, Understand, and Measure Compassion When We See It?”   Authored by a consortium of scientists from different fields and universities, this interdisciplinary review explores the strengths and limitations of different approaches for studying compassion, and offers promising strategies for moving the burgeoning field forward.

Notably, the majority of the paper’s authors have come to the field of compassion research through their earlier research on CBCT ®.  Medical anthropologist Jennifer Mascaro, PhD, and psychiatrist Charles Raison, MD, are well known as pioneers of the earliest CBCT ® studies on stress physiology and empathic accuracy.  Religion scholar Marianne Parrish Florian, M.A., M.T.S., herself a certified CBCT ® teacher, and Patricia “Kim” Palmer, Manager of Research Projects in Spiritual Health, Woodruff Health Sciences Center, Emory University, each have contributed to seminal research on Compassion-Centered Spiritual Health, a program based on CBCT ® and chaplaincy practice at Emory Healthcare in recent years.

“Ways of Knowing Compassion:  How Do We Come to Know, Understand, and Measure Compassion When We See It?” is a theoretical review of how we know and understand compassion, building on the authors’ observation that compassion can be characterized by three basic criteria:  “awareness of another’s suffering, a benevolent emotional or affective response, and the motivation to help or act.”  The paper aims to promote communication, collaboration, and convergence across disciplines.  The authors have sought to identify complements across different research methodologies in order to promote method-mixing and ultimately strengthen the evidence and rigor of research on compassion.

 

October 27, 2020

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Based at the University of Heidelberg, Germany, Corina Aguilar-Raab, PhD ,  is a clinical psychologist, psychotherapist, and professor at the Institute of Medical Psychology. Certified to teach CBCT ® since 2016, Dr. Aguilar-Raab teaches and researches in the fields of clinical psychology and psychotherapy, emphasizing how positive social interactions in close relationships can be improved. She has just completed a book on how systemic aspects of therapy can be combined with Buddhist philosophy and practice.  Secular approaches, especially CBCT ®, are highlighted in Systemische Praxis und Buddhismus:  Ein Wegweiser für achtsame Therapie und Beratung (Systemic Practice and Buddhism: A Guide to Mindful Therapy and Counseling) to be published in December.

During the summer of 2019, Dr. Aguilar-Raab led a large CBCT ® study at Institute of Medical Psychology, Heidelberg University.  The focus was on depressed women and their partners.  In a randomized control study design of fifty couples, half received CBCT ® for couples and the other half treatment as usual.  Following a psychobiological evaluation approach, first data analyses indicated the overall positive effects with the reduction of distress and symptom burdens.

In the upcoming year, Dr. Aguilar-Raab will integrate CBCT ® into the teaching of psychology students at Heidelberg University, and she is planning a CBCT ® course for early 2021 at Tibethaus in Frankfurt.  Dr. Aguilar-Raab is in the process of recruiting German-speaking candidates who will become certified to teach CBCT ® to support the expansion of the program within the German-speaking world.

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Based in Brasília, Brazil, Bruno Vichi holds graduate degrees in both law and psychoanalysis and for 20 years has worked as a lawyer, mediator, and therapist. 

Certified to teach CBCT since 2017, Vichi continues to offer courses throughout Brazil to doctors, teachers, educators, and the public.  In 2021, he will be support a pilot project combining CBCT ® and SEE Learning™ in the curriculum at Centro de Ensino Fundamental 01 (CEF01), a public school for ages 6 to 15, located in the Federal District.

Mr. Vichi recently led a tailored 8-week CBCT ® course for a group of Brazilian women activists.  Participants ranged from a host of organizations, including UN Women – the United Nations entity dedicated to gender equality and the empowerment of women.  The idea was to create a safe and nurturing space for women working within areas of human rights, indigenous communities, food security, and environmental issues.  The activists were seeking to develop personal resources, resiliency skills, and a more compassionate approach after the 2018 Brazilian presidential election. According to Erika Yamada of the United Nations Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples:

“ It was important to gather this group of friends and activists around a practice of meditation at that moment where everybody was feeling very hopeless and scared.  CBCT ® offered us important inner tools to deal with our political context, which got even more challenging the following months. With those tools, we found motivation to self-organize compassionate meetings to meditate together. We have continued to use the CBCT ® vocabulary and practice to take care of ourselves and of each other.

Help us to continue spreading compassion. The Seeds of Compassion scholarship fund was set up in 2013 to help the financial needs of those seeking certification. To donate, click here

The CBCT ® Teacher Certification program will be accepting applications for the 2021 cohort soon. 

 

May 12, 2020

CBCT® Supports Healthcare Workers

Since 2014 CBCT® has been taught to faculty, staff, and students at the Emory School of Medicine.  In light of COVID-19 and sudden postponement of clinical training, the school’s leadership requested a special online training. Twice weekly, these future healthcare heroes are meeting virtually to develop the inner skills to support their resilience and compassion.

 

CBCT® to Support Illinois Physicians State-Wide

In 2021, the University of Illinois will provide CBCT® as part of a groundbreaking wellness curriculum for its first-year medical students across the state.  In addition to the five Emory-Certified CBCT Instructors in Peoria, the Center is now training eight faculty and staff to support the expansion to the Rockford and Chicago campuses

 

Co mpassion-Centered Spiritual Health in 12 Hospitals

CBCT’s partnership with Spiritual Health at Emory Healthcare continues to expand to provide meaningful training and tools for chaplains and their patients.  Visit the Compassion-Centered Spiritual Health website to learn more about this research-based approach to hospital chaplaincy and the new two-year CCSH Fellowship available to select spiritual health clinicians.

Join Us for Daily Compassion Practice and Fellowship!

Since we began offering this service in March, hundreds have attended these sessions led by CBCT® teachers, meeting twice daily at 9:00am and 7:00pm EST.  Free and open to all.  Details here.   Spanish-speaking Online Sessions are also available, organized by CBCT® Senior Teacher Samuel Fernandez-Carriba.  Details here.

 

Learn more about CBCT

Zipporah Slaughter

Program Coordinator

Center for Contemplative Science and Compassion-Based Ethics

Emory University

Office:  404.727.8166

Email:   zipporah.slaughter@emory.edu

Get Involved/Contact

The CBCT® program includes a growing number of certified instructors and is regularly expanding its programming and research areas. We welcome offers of support and ideas for new applications or populations who may benefit from learning the core CBCT® concepts and skills. Please contact Zipporah Slaughter for all inquiries, zipporah.slaughter@emory.edu / 404.727.8166.